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We are pleased to announce that GLC has completed the vigorous checks & joined CHAS. This body is a highly regarded SSIP. Please log onto the scheme to examine our credentials.  
Wednesday, 22 February 2017

GLC News

  Greater London Cradles is proud to announce that we have applied and been accepted as a member of the suspended access industry authority, 'SAEMA'. This will help clarify GLC’s voice concerning the changing shape of Health and Safety in the suspended access industry. The only trade association dedicated to this specialist sector, 'SAEMA' is committed to advancing safety, standards and best practice in the temporary and permanent suspended access industry. Its member companies provide safe places of work for those tradesmen involved in working at height to install and maintain façades. Click here to read more about 'SAEMA'.
Tuesday, 19 July 2016

GLC News

From September 2015 Greater London Cradles has moved premises from 186 Empire Road, Perivale to Vanguard Business Centre, Alperton Lane, Perivale, Middlesex, UB6 8AA. Not a big move in distance but a giant leap in terms of facilities.   Please use this address for all future correspondence and please be patient with any glitches that may arise due to the relocation of address.   Click here to see our new address on google maps   Thanks from the GLC team.
Wednesday, 11 November 2015

GLC News

November was Movember at GLC. Steve & Adam MacCarthy decided that it was about time they did their bit for charity & grow a moustache (as You can see from the photo!)   If you would be kind enough to sponsor our team please use the link provided.   Http://uk.movember.com/mospace/6877405       Related articles Woman who grows moustache for Movember considers keeping it (express.co.uk) Blue & Green Tomorrow does Movember for men's health (blueandgreentomorrow.com) In Defense Of "Movember" (webnerhouse.com) November/Movember (thenestatjohnrichardsblog.wordpress.com) What's with all the hype? Moustaches (jacamoblog.co.uk) Top 10: Moustache Styles For Movember (jacamoblog.co.uk)  
Sunday, 08 December 2013

GLC News

  Greater London Cradles is proud to announce that we have applied and been accepted as a member of the suspended access industry authority, 'SAEMA'. This will help clarify GLC’s voice concerning the changing shape of Health and Safety in the suspended access industry. The only trade association dedicated to this specialist sector, 'SAEMA' is committed to advancing safety, standards and best practice in the temporary and permanent suspended access industry. Its member companies provide safe places of work for those tradesmen involved in working at height to install and maintain façades. Click here to read more about 'SAEMA'.
Tuesday, 19 July 2016

GLC News

November was Movember at GLC. Steve & Adam MacCarthy decided that it was about time they did their bit for charity & grow a moustache (as You can see from the photo!)   If you would be kind enough to sponsor our team please use the link provided.   Http://uk.movember.com/mospace/6877405       Related articles Woman who grows moustache for Movember considers keeping it (express.co.uk) Blue & Green Tomorrow does Movember for men's health (blueandgreentomorrow.com) In Defense Of "Movember" (webnerhouse.com) November/Movember (thenestatjohnrichardsblog.wordpress.com) What's with all the hype? Moustaches (jacamoblog.co.uk) Top 10: Moustache Styles For Movember (jacamoblog.co.uk)  
Sunday, 08 December 2013

GLC News

The rise in GDP in the third quarter masked a fall in construction. Photograph: Roger Bamber/Alamy Building firms are usually the first into a recession and the fastest out of the blocks when confidence returns. With a lift in confidence comes a return to soaring land values, something that spurs them to unwrap mothballed cranes and mix up the cement. Not in this recession. The absence of business and household confidence has dampened demand. Making matters worse for this most cyclical of industries, the Bank of England's low interest rate policy has prevented the usual dramatic fall in house prices during the crash and consequent upswing when the worst of the recession is over. A lack of mortgages and commercial loans from lending institutions is also a prominent feature of the post-recession scene. In response, builders have kept under lock and key their massive landbanks of sites ripe for development. The Office for National Statistics found construction industry output shrank 4% in the year to the end of September and 0.6% on the previous quarter. Construction accounts for 7.2% of the economy and in the past has provided a strong impetus for growth out of recession. Some analysts have argued the survey of construction by the ONS has underplayed its recovery, others say growth remains depressed and only clocked up positive figures last year as building on the Olympics site and London's tallest building, the Shard, fed into the figures. Whichever way the figures add up, it's not a positive result. The same can be said of manufacturing, which was supposed to lead the country out of recession as part of a re-balancing away from sectors like construction. However, manufacturing was subdued and extra spending on gas and electricity following huge energy price hikes accounted for most of the growth in "production industries". One-off factors also played a part in the ONS asking analysts to take overall figures for the second quarter of the year and the third together to get a more rounded picture of the economy's health. The royal wedding and Japanese tsunami played havoc with official data in the spring and contributed to the exceptionally low 0.1% growth figure in the second three months of 2011. Taken together with the 0.5% in the third quarter, growth averaged 0.3% in each of the last two quarters, half the 0.6% per quarter clocked up by the UK economy in previous recoveries. Looking back over the full year, the ONS says growth was 0.5%, or 0.125% in each quarter, which is likely to be the weakest of any eurozone country except Greece and well below US growth of 2.5%. Unlike the US, where manufacturing production and business investment are prominent, the UK was saved from sinking back into recession by the banking industry, telecoms, computing and government spending. A look at the banking sector shows it had nowhere to go but up after sinking to the point of near bankruptcy in the crash. Profits at Barclays were up in the first nine months of the year. HSBC, with its largely foreign revenues, should also see profits up this year. Yet the next year is expected to be less rosy, especially for state-owned Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland, with the euro crisis persisting and lending still low. The supertanker that is Whitehall has continued sailing straight ahead, at least when it concerns spending on health and education, with a rise of 0.5% on the previous quarter, but spending is expected to turn south within the next year as harsher cuts take effect. Which leaves telecoms and computing to offset retrenchment in other sectors. Can the UK build growth on a desire to own a tablet computer or smartphone? It will take more than that. Original author: Phillip Inman
Friday, 26 July 2013

Industry News

An increase in house building could be on the cards in certain areas, thanks to new legislation being brought into force by the government that will give social tenants the power to boost house building in their area. Right to Transfer, which is coming into force in the autumn, will mean that tenants can take control over future investment into their communities by requesting new homes to be built. The plans will work alongside the £19.5bn public and private investment to build 170,000 affordable homes by 2015, and plans in the Spending Review to invest £3.3bn to deliver 165,000 affordable homes over 3 years from 2015 – equivalent to the fastest annual rate of housebuilding for 20 years. As part of the deal, housing associations will need to show plans in place that will lead to the building of new affordable homes and the improvement of existing stock. Housing minister Mark Prisk said: “Combined with the multi-billion pound investment we’re making, these steps will help ensure we reach the fastest annual rate of housebuilding for two decades, delivering the affordable homes this country needs, and putting real power into the hands of local people who live in them.” The new rights will also let social tenants who want to see their homes owned, managed and maintained by a housing association rather than a council, request for a change of ownership.
Friday, 26 July 2013

Industry News

From September 2015 Greater London Cradles has moved premises from 186 Empire Road, Perivale to Vanguard Business Centre, Alperton Lane, Perivale, Middlesex, UB6 8AA. Not a big move in distance but a giant leap in terms of facilities.   Please use this address for all future correspondence and please be patient with any glitches that may arise due to the relocation of address.   Click here to see our new address on google maps   Thanks from the GLC team.
Wednesday, 11 November 2015

GLC News

Manufacturers' trade body EEF says firms can see an 'order pipeline' for their products but customers remain jittery. Photograph Alamy A later than usual Chinese new year and a bit of snow prevented the manufacturing sector from expanding in February as expected. Putting aside the usual factors – recession in the eurozone and the struggle to access credit – the white stuff and a celebration in China were to blame. As it turned out, factory output contracted and in quite a big way. A figure of 47.9 in the CIPS/Markit survey a significant turnaround from the expected 51, when a figure below 50 shows a period of contraction. While the appearance of myriad dance troops, snaking their way around town squares, adorned in red tiger costumes, may have delayed orders for manufactured goods from Chinese customers, it shows how vulnerable UK manufacturing remains to small external shocks. Fragile doesn't cover it. Lee Hopley, chief economist at the EEF, the main manufacturers' lobby group, says firms can see there is an "order pipeline" for their goods, but customers remain jittery. As soon as there is a little calm, something knocks everyone's confidence for six. The Italian elections and the $85bn (£56bn) Sequestor of spending cuts in the US are the latest. Across Europe, surveys showed manufacturing contracting in every country except Germany. To make matters worse, China's manufacturing sector ended a brief run of growth. All of which will rebound on the UK in the coming months through lower orders. The only bright spot was that demand from emerging markets held up, though the UK has largely failed to break into new territory since the crash, despite the lower pound. George Osborne, worried that the UK may slip back into another recession, can comfort himself that the construction sector has regained some of its strength. Figures for the end of last year from the Office for National Statistics show commercial building, especially in London, has increased activity, offsetting somewhat the weakness in manufacturing. A boost in quantitative easing by the Bank of England next week and a lower pound, which go hand in hand, could also support a bounce back in economic activity (with the cost of higher inflation from higher-priced imports) Nevertheless, the question remains, how to spur growth in strategically important sectors? We need more homes more than we need speculatively built office buildings in central London. We need private firms to invest in new equipment, not just hire cheap graduate labour. We need an energy policy that can speak its name and investment to match its ambitions. We need to support infrastructure spending that rejects the quick fix of foreign labour and hails UK engineers at its heart. There is more. The list is long. The word from the Treasury is that plenty of initiatives are in the pipeline. The Budget will be a dry, steady-as-she-goes affair. Yet the Tory right will be as unhappy with this stance as the opposition. They have coalesced around tax cuts for low income workers as one part of the answer. Surely Osborne must react. Original author: Phillip Inman
Friday, 01 March 2013

Industry News

  At the start of February 2003, Greater London Cradles was formed making this month our ten year anniversary. From humble beginnings a business was started. With a great deal of hard work, meticulous planning and some good fortune, GLC has evolved into one of the south-east's major temporary access suppliers. During this time we have worked on some prestigious projects at Canary Wharf, Madame Tussauds, the Olympic Village and many more sites covering the length and breadth of the country. Over time, we have built up strong working partnerships with customers from all spheres of the construction industry, from multi-national companies to sole traders.  Our Mission Statement is to treat all customers with the highest service and respect. Our Health and Safety procedures are of the same high standard on all sites GLC are working on, through constant co-ordination with all stakeholders on site. This celebration is not only for us at GLC to enjoy, but it is shared with all our customers, past, present and future in making GLC a success in the temporary cradle access industry! Here's to the next ten years...thank you to all our customers!    
Thursday, 14 February 2013

GLC News

  In the suspended access business, safety is, and will always be, GLC's number one priority. Constructionline is a national online database, the UK's largest register for pre-qualified contractors and consultants. In terms of efficiency, time, cost saving and best practice, 'constructionline' is proven to deliver to public and private sector organisations alike. By providing an up-to-date register for 'constructionline' contracts, 'contructionline' is a common-sense solution that 8,000 buyers from over 2,000 organisations are already making the most of. All suppliers must be pre-qualified to government standards, and maintain a relationship with a range of industry and government partners. This ensures that 'constructionline' remains relevant to procurement professionals within the construction industry. http://www.constructionline.co.uk/        
Thursday, 31 January 2013

GLC News

  We have recently had the fortune to hire out a cradle to a production company, who are producing an advert for 'Compare the Market.com', the consumer search engine. The advert revolves around a certain meerkat, GLC access equipment and a window cleaner, but that is all I'm allowed to say...! The television advert should be out in circulation within the next two months and we are very much looking forward to it.      
Saturday, 30 June 2012

GLC News

    We have been in the access equipment business for many years now, and GLC has just been approved for our third consecutive year with the 'Safecontractor' accreditation. Safety comes first with GLC...'Safecontractor' is an web database of approved contractors, who have been rigorously vetted to ensure their Health & Safety standards are of the highest quality. 'Safecontractor' is a leading health and safety pre-qualification assessment scheme. It is dedicated to promoting higher standards of competence and compliance through the provision of the building industry specific, and tailored Health and Safety assessments in this sector. This is highlighted in our service contracts; for all our access solutions, we provide all the safety required to complete each project at the highest calibre. The accreditation also includes the following: Permits to work Health and Safety Systems, including any health surveillance and screening process Accident Reporting and Analysis Any prosecutions or notices Relevant experience Quality Assurance Systems Training Insurance details
Wednesday, 02 May 2012

GLC News

Construction has flatlined since the second quarter of last year. Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images In a recovery, construction leads the way. Its a truism of economic analysis that construction, while only a small part of the economy at around 7%, gives GDP a strong push out of a recessionary trough. The property market may be the principle cause of one recession after another, but at least construction can be guaranteed to lead us out. Friday's figures from the Office For National Statistics show this time it could be different. Data for the fourth quarter is distinctly underwhelming. Output contracted 0.5% quarter-on-quarter, limiting annual seasonally adjusted growth to 2.8% in 2011. In 2008, output declined 2.7% prior to the biggest annual fall on record, 2009's 13.4% drop. In 2010, the industry clawed back some of losses with a growth spurt of 8.2%, almost all of it (8.1%) in the second quarter of the year. Since then, like the rest of the economy, construction has flatlined. Simon Rawlinson, head of research at construction consultants EC Harris, said the outlook was not very rosy either. He said dramatic cuts in public sector non-house building will pull down the industry's output, offsetting a spurt in infrastructure spending, that in turn is expected to level off. "The Q4 data indicates that public sector cuts are really beginning to bite (7.3% drop in Q4). This confirms a trend that was evident in the monthly output releases issued in November and December and it is the commercial sector in particular that has been impacted by the loss of output from the public sector." "The real star performer in 2011 has been infrastructure, which has delivered £1.6bn year-on-year growth. It will difficult to sustain this rate of growth in 2012, however the pipeline in place suggests that volumes will stay at current high levels." His assessment is that output will fall this year. Contrast the situation with the early 1990s. The slump after the 1980s housing bubble burst was almost as bad – a cumulative decline of 14.3% by 1994 compared to a 16.1% during 2008 and 2009 – but once it was over there was consistent growth. There was the occasional negative quarter between 1995 and 2001, but every year was positive. It looks like this year will be a struggle and many subsequent years as cuts continue and austerity takes precedence. Original author: Phillip Inman
Friday, 10 February 2012

Industry News